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Keyhole Angelfish

$45.00
$40.50

Please Note: Due to variations within species, your item may not look identical to the image provided. Approximate size range may also vary between individual specimen.

Centropyge tibicin

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Quick Stats

The Keyhole Angelfish is primarily a dull black. The pelvic and lower portion of the anal fins are yellow. The white vertical bar found in the centre of the body gives it its name.

Provide a 250 litre or larger tank for the Keyhole Angelfish. It should have large amounts of live rock for hiding and grazing. It may nip at stony and soft corals and clam mantles. It will also feed on filamentous algae and diatoms.

Its diet should also include Spirulina, marine algae, high-quality angelfish preparations, mysis or frozen shrimp, and other meaty items. Feed 2-3 times daily.

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We have included a general guideline in our Quick Stats designating the level of care different fish species require. This is provided to give you an idea of the hardiness of the species, which you can then match to your level of experience.

 – EASY: 

Although not indestructible, the species in this category have proven to be not too demanding in the care that they require. Most of these species do not have special feeding requirements and can tolerate less than perfect water conditions.

 – MODERATE:

The species in this category demand a bit more attention than those that are considered “Easy” to care for. Some of these species may have special feeding, lighting, or water movement requirements and may require water conditions closer to those found in nature.

 – DIFFICULT:

Species that fall into this category demand a higher level of both attention and water quality. Many of these species have special feeding, water quality, movement and lighting requirements. They should only be added to a mature, well-established aquarium system as many reef aquariums do not become fully established for many months – sometimes up to a year. These “Difficult” species should be among the last additions to your collection.

The smallest aquarium that we recommend for housing these species of fish.  This takes into account its size at maturity, temperament, swimming habits, as well as food and water requirements. Many species in their juvenile state can be kept in a smaller aquarium, but we only recommend this as temporary holding or housing in a quarantine aquarium.

Displays the maximum size the individual species will reach in the home aquarium. Growth rates will vary depending on the size of the aquarium, the quantity and size of other tank mates, the diet that the fish is provided, water conditions and the amount of free-swimming room within the aquarium. We highly recommend using this maximum size when planning the inhabitants for your aquarium so you do not run into an overstocked aquarium in the future, which may lead to unwanted stress and aggression.

We have included a general guideline in our Quick Stats designating the compatibility of different fish species with other livestock in an aquarium. This is provided to give you an idea of what species can be housed with other fish, coral and invertebrate.

 – REEF SAFE:

Species within this category are considered 100% reef safe.  

 – CORAL ONLY:

Species within this category are considered safe with coral but may be prone to consuming or harassing invertebrates such as shrimp, crabs, snails, anemones or clams.

 – INVERTS ONLY:

Species within this category are considered safe with invertebrate but may be prone to consuming or harassing corals.

 – FISH ONLY:

Species within this category are considered safe with fish but may be prone to consuming or harassing corals and invertebrate.

– FISH & CORAL ONLY:

Species within this category are considered safe with fish and coral but may be prone to consuming or harassing invertebrate.

 – FISH & INVERTS ONLY:

Species within this category are considered safe with fish and invertebrate but may be prone to consuming or harassing corals.

 – CORAL & INVERT ONLY:

Species within this category are considered safe with coral and invertebrate but may be prone to consuming or harassing fish.

PLEASE NOTE:

These are only our recommendations and whilst a fish may be marked as unsafe for a particular group, depending on the individual fish, may be fine to co-exist with that group.

For example, a fish marked as “Fish & Coral Only”, may only consume particular invertebrate such as Shrimp or Snails or could also co-exist with them and you would experience no issues at all.

It is important to understand that this is a general guideline, and each aquarium is unique. It is always best to stock an aquarium with the smaller passive species first, and the larger more aggressive last. In addition, when incorporating fish of same genus or species, it is ideal to acclimate them to the aquarium simultaneously.

 – PEACEFUL:

Species within this category do not pose a real threat toward other fishes, and are very passive and sometimes reclusive in nature.

 – SEMI-AGGRESSIVE:

Species within this category are normally active fish, and may occasionally chase or show aggression towards one another or similar shaped tank mates.  When placing Semi-Aggressive species in your aquarium, be sure to introduce them after the smaller, more passive fish have been established.

 – AGGRESSIVE:

Species within this category are normally territorial and bold fish that should be housed with fish that are of the same demeanor. Aggressive fish should be the last fish introduced into the aquarium.

It is important to understand that this is a general guideline, and each aquarium is unique. It is always best to stock an aquarium with the smaller passive species first, and the larger more aggressive last. In addition, when incorporating fish of same genus or species, it is ideal to acclimate them to the aquarium simultaneously.

 – PEACEFUL:

Species within this category do not pose a real threat toward other fishes, and are very passive and sometimes reclusive in nature.

 – SEMI-AGGRESSIVE:

Species within this category are normally active fish, and may occasionally chase or show aggression towards one another or similar shaped tank mates.  When placing Semi-Aggressive species in your aquarium, be sure to introduce them after the smaller, more passive fish have been established.

 – AGGRESSIVE:

Species within this category are normally territorial and bold fish that should be housed with fish that are of the same demeanor. Aggressive fish should be the last fish introduced into the aquarium.

Represents the types of food that the individual species is inclined to eat in their natural environment. However, many species will accept different foods in the home aquarium. For example, Tangs are herbivorous in nature, feeding mostly on algae. However, they will readily accept meaty foods in the aquarium.  For proper nutrition and health, it is very important to offer a wide range of foods to all tank inhabitants.

 – HERBIVORE:

Species consumes algae or plant based foods.

 – CARNIVORE:

Species consumes meaty foods.

 – LIVE FOOD:

Species consumes live foods, such as; Copepods, Shrimp or small fish.

  – PREPARED FOODS:

Species consumes prepared foods such as; frozen Mysis Shrimp, Brine Shrimp, Pellets and Flake.

– OMNIVORE:

Species consumes a wide variety of foods, which may include; prepared foods, pellets, meaty or algae based foods.

PLEASE NOTE:

Just because a species is listed as eating a certain food group, does not mean it will not eat other food groups.  For example, a fish listed as Carnivore, can and will still eat Prepared Foods.

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